• [contact-form-7 id=”68688″ title=”Contact form 1″]
  • SOURCE

    November 17, 2016

    Findings from a study presented this week at the American Heart Association Scientific Association in New Orleans concluded that doctors can further assess a patient’s future heart risk by also checking calcium buildup caused by plaque via a PET/CT scan.

    This extra measure can mean the difference between life and death for some patients.

    “Many patients may mistakenly understand or interpret a “negative” stress test to mean, “you don’t have any coronary disease at all”,” Viet T. Le, MPAS, PA-C, lead author and cardiology research physician assistant at Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute told HCB News. The study team also included physicians. “Some clinicians may also interpret a negative test to mean the same. This simply is not true.”

    Le explained that traditional stress tests – whether chemical or exertion-based – only indicate a moment in time. The stress test indicates that blood flow appeared to pass through the coronary artery well enough not to raise any concerns.

    Cardiac experts have known for years that calcium left by plaque is a good marker of heart disease. But there was not good imaging technology to measure it without exposing the patient to too much radiation. Le said that changed about five years ago with PET/CT scan applications. PET/CT scanning can measure calcium build-up, which is a predictor of future cardiac events.

    “PET/CT allows clinicians to answer both the immediate question of whether a patient’s current symptoms could be related to a coronary obstruction and whether they need to be more vigilant,” said Le.

    The research team studied 658 men and women between the ages of 57 and 77 who passed a stress test for blocked arteries, but were later found to have plaque buildup, indicated by the calcium in their arteries through PET/CT studies. For five percent of these patients, the calcium was a predictor, within a year, of serious cardiac events, such as heart attack or stroke. In some cases, such events resulted in sudden death.

    Calcification cannot be reversed. However, the condition can be managed with lifestyle changes, managing high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes and with the use of risk-reducing medications.

    Le stressed that the team’s findings are not intended to replace clinical thinking or assessment of the patient when they present with symptoms of suspicious active coronary disease.

    “We can provide both patients and clinicians a better assessment of that patient’s coronary health beyond assessing blood flow on the day they present to the ER,” Le explained. “PET/CT screening will allow both patients and clinicians to have a more informed decision process for treatment and risk reduction.”

     

    Comments are closed

    Sorry, but you cannot leave a comment for this post.

     

    Latest Posts

    Latest Video

     
     

    LATEST POSTS

    In less than one hour, WFNS Neuroanatomy Series Wednesday 12 pm GMT, 8 am EST

    WFNS Neuroanatomy Series Wednesday 12 pm GMT, 8 am EST TO REGISTER https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tCjkjEphTrayRzDAfo5FbQ YOU TUBE LINK: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvMRufu7rEnrIFlbWHScE5A

    Join Mailing List

    JOIN MAILING LIST GO TO FORM AT TOP OF PAGE AND PUT YOUR EMAIL IN!! FACEBOOK

    “Neuroanatomy through Clinical Cases” , Second Edition by Hal Blumenfeld, Yale University

    SOURCE Printer Friendly Hal Blumenfeld, Yale University School of Medicine The book can be ordered through the Sinauer Associates website. Sample content is also available on that page…. Read More →

    Request a Webcast

    desertedbeach@hotmail.com

    Request Panel Spot

    desertedbeach@hotmail.com please tell us the date, time, studio of Neuroanatomist P P

    MAILING LIST

    MAILING LIST desertedbeach@hotmail.com