• [contact-form-7 id=”68688″ title=”Contact form 1″]
  • SOURCE

    (Nanowerk News) Researchers in India and Japan have developed an improved method for using graphene-based transistors to detect disease-causing genes.Graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) can detect harmful genes through DNA hybridization, which occurs when a ‘probe DNA’ combines, or hybridizes, with its complementary ‘target DNA.’ Electrical conduction changes in the transistor when hybridization occurs.Nobutaka Hanagata of Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science and colleagues improved the sensors by attaching the probe DNA to the transistor through a drying process. This eliminated the need for a costly and time-consuming addition of ‘linker’ nucleotide sequences, which have been commonly used to attach probes to transistors.Schematic of a graphene-based field-effect transistor (left) and an atomic force microscopy image of graphene covered with single-stranded probe DNA (right)

    Schematic of a graphene-based field-effect transistor (left) and an atomic force microscopy image of graphene covered with single-stranded probe DNA (right). (click on image to enlarge)The research team designed GFETs that consist of titanium-gold electrodes on graphene—a one-atom-thick layer of carbon—deposited on a silicon substrate. Then they deposited the DNA probe, in a saline solution, onto the GFET and left it to dry. They found that this drying process led to direct immobilization of the probe DNA on the graphene surface without a need for linkers.

    The target DNA, also in saline solution, was then added to the transistor and incubated for four hours for hybridization to occur.The GFET operated successfully using this preparation method. A change in electrical conduction was detected when the probe and target combined, signaling the presence of a harmful target gene. Conduction did not change when other non-complementary DNA was applied.DNA hybridization is usually detected by labelling the target with a fluorescent dye, which shines brightly when it combines with its probe.

    But this method involves a complicated labelling procedure and needs an expensive laser scanner to detect fluorescence intensity. GFETs could become a cheaper, easier to operate, and more sensitive alternative for detecting genetic diseases.“Further development of this GFET device could be explored with enhanced performance for future biosensor applications, particularly in the detection of genetic diseases,” conclude the researchers in their study published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials (“Simplified detection of the hybridized DNA using a graphene field effect transistor”).

    Source: National Institute for Materials Science

    Read more: Improving DNA-detecting transistors with graphene

     

    Comments are closed

    Sorry, but you cannot leave a comment for this post.

     

    Latest Posts

    Latest Video

     
     

    LATEST POSTS

    In less than one hour, WFNS Neuroanatomy Series Wednesday 12 pm GMT, 8 am EST

    WFNS Neuroanatomy Series Wednesday 12 pm GMT, 8 am EST TO REGISTER https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_tCjkjEphTrayRzDAfo5FbQ YOU TUBE LINK: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvMRufu7rEnrIFlbWHScE5A

    Join Mailing List

    JOIN MAILING LIST GO TO FORM AT TOP OF PAGE AND PUT YOUR EMAIL IN!! FACEBOOK

    “Neuroanatomy through Clinical Cases” , Second Edition by Hal Blumenfeld, Yale University

    SOURCE Printer Friendly Hal Blumenfeld, Yale University School of Medicine The book can be ordered through the Sinauer Associates website. Sample content is also available on that page…. Read More →

    Request a Webcast

    desertedbeach@hotmail.com

    Request Panel Spot

    desertedbeach@hotmail.com please tell us the date, time, studio of Neuroanatomist P P

    MAILING LIST

    MAILING LIST desertedbeach@hotmail.com